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NTproBNP levels are significantly lower in blacks

(HealthDay)—Plasma N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NTproBNP) levels are significantly lower for black than white individuals, according to a study published online Nov. 22 in JAMA Cardiology.

Children with heart disease are being let down by lack of clinical trials, study finds

Less than one per cent of UK children born with congenital heart disease are enrolled in clinical trials looking to improve treatments, research funded by the British Heart Foundation and led by the University of Birmingham and Birmingham Children's Hospital has found.

Low-salt and heart-healthy dash diet as effective as drugs for some adults with high blood pressure

A study of more than 400 adults with prehypertension, or stage 1 high blood pressure, found that combining a low-salt diet with the heart-healthy DASH diet substantially lowers systolic blood pressure—the top number in a blood pressure test—especially in people with higher baseline systolic readings.

MicroRNA molecule can cause pathological changes in the heart

Cardiac fibrosis involves an increase of connective tissue in the cardiac muscle, causing a loss of function. A team of researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now discovered that microRNA 29 (miR-29) plays an important role in the formation of tissue fibrosis. They occur less frequently when miR-29 is suppressed in cardiac muscle cells. Older studies had suggested that it was in fact low levels of miR-29 that caused fibrosis. The new insights point to potential new approaches for developing drugs against fibrotic diseases.

HIV-positive adults are under-treated for cardiovascular problems compared to those without HIV

People with both HIV and risk factors for heart disease and stroke were less likely to be treated with cholesterol-lowering statin drugs and aspirin than patients without HIV. The researchers believe this to be the first national study comparing statin use in patients with and without HIV and the first extensive analysis using U.S. data.

Stroke patients may have more time to get treatment, study finds

Patients and doctors long have relied on a simple rule of thumb for seeking care after an ischemic stroke: "Time is brain."

Any physical activity in elderly better than none at all for reducing cardiovascular risk

Any physical activity in the elderly is better than none at all for reducing cardiovascular risk, according to an 18-year study in more than 24 000 adults published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology.

Cases of heart failure continue to rise; poorest people worst affected

The number of people being diagnosed with heart failure in the UK continues to rise as a result of demographic changes common to many developed countries, new research by The George Institute for Global Health at the University of Oxford suggests.

Increased repolarization dispersion seen in SCD survivors

(HealthDay)—Survivors of sudden cardiac death (SCD) with structurally normal hearts have increased dispersion of repolarization after exertion, and this is detectable on non-invasive electrocardiographic imaging (ECGi), according to a study published online Nov. 1 in the Journal of Cardiovascular Electrophysiology.

Researchers link post-right stroke delirium and spatial neglect to common brain mechanism

Stroke researchers at Kessler Foundation have proposed a theory for the high incidence of delirium and spatial neglect after right-brain stroke. Their findings are detailed in "Disruption of the ascending arousal system and cortical attention network in post-stroke delirium and spatial neglect," which was published online ahead of print on September 27, 2017 by Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews. The authors are Olga Boukrina, PhD, research scientist, and A.M. Barrett, MD, director of Stroke Rehabilitation Research at Kessler Foundation.

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